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Alpine Shelter Skuta


 

 

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Alpine Shelter Skuta


 

 

 
 

Skuta Mountain, Slovenia
46°21'32.5N  14°34'04.4E
August 2015

Designed for an alpine site on Skuta Mountain in Slovenia, this cabin offers an intimate refuge for eight visitors nestled in the scenic Alps. The building shifts its roof line like a series of mountain peaks, shedding snow and framing distant scenes.

The design minimizes environmental impacts: visually, gray, glass reinforced concrete cladding blends into the mountain’s stone, and performatively, natural ventilation, robust insulation for cold nights, and a lack of electricity preserve the shelter’s natural setting.

With a minimal footprint. the design consists of three modules, in part to allow for transport and also to programmatically divide the space. Deployed by helicopter as three modules, the building was joined onsite into one mass. The first module is designated for entry, storage and preparation of a modest dinner. The second module allows for both sleeping and socializing, with beds that face each other for communal eating and gathering. The last is module is mainly for sleeping, offering two levels of bunks. From both sides of the shelter, one can experience the panoramic views of both Skuta, the valley, and the city of Ljubljana. In contrast to the thick gray cladding of the exterior, the interior is a warm wood.

Sited in the Slovenian Alps, the bivouac is a shifting series of peaks, blending seamlessly with the surrounding environment and providing scenic views for mountaineers who venture inside.

Collaboration with with OFIS Arhitekti, Frederick Kim, Katie MacDonald, AKT II, Rieder Smart Elements, and the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

Header Image © Anze Cokl

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l'Ecole Du Bon Sens


 

“[Architecture] is fundamentally confronted with questions of human existence in space and time;
it expresses and relates man’s being in the world.”

- Juhani Pallasmaa, The Eyes of the Skin

l'Ecole Du Bon Sens


 

“[Architecture] is fundamentally confronted with questions of human existence in space and time;
it expresses and relates man’s being in the world.”

- Juhani Pallasmaa, The Eyes of the Skin

Model of Scheme

How can space illustrate the un-seeable? How can it engage our senses? This thesis project was an attempt to orchestrate the architecture of the invisible, one that is sensed primarily by the nose rather than the eyes. Taking advantage of an abandoned railway tunnel, the work focuses on the mediation of human perception and the earth’s richness of botanicals and essences.

Longitudinal Section

Plan

Both public and private, the intervention moves from city to garden through a Parisian perfume academy. The scheme consists of several distinct moments along the linear rail track: the entry, the botanical cells, the bar and distillation area, the studios and scent rooms, the master’s studio and finally the exit/emergence into the Parc Montsouris.

The composition is a processional experience to understand the interplay of space and scent. A large sectional model, made of cedar, was a useful tool in presenting the invisible qualities of the project, while still maintaining a traditional representation of an architectural scheme. The drawings were developed using various hand and digital techniques to convey atmosphere, sectional qualities, and challenge typical perception in a two-dimensional format. The representation of the project was aimed at uncovering the invisible qualities of our senses, and bridge a disconnect between space and the experience of the body within it.

The project was awarded the Charles Goodwin Sands Memorial Medal in May of 2014, which is awarded for exceptional merit in architectural design.

Isometric

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MINI CITY DETROIT_


 

MINI CITY DETROIT

 

 

 

MINI CITY DETROIT_


 

MINI CITY DETROIT

 

 

 

Urban Context

The design pulls the existing urban grid into the site to generate the driving axes of the scheme, allowing for a merging of both the historic city and its potential as a new addition to the woodward avenue corridor.

Formal Generation

Urban Section

Using the surrounding urban fabric as the generator for a new vision of the city, MiniCity Detroit utilizes the historic and present urban conditions to materialize a concept that directly responds to the site. Bringing the existing physical form and history into the plan, the conditions set by the site provide a framework for renewal.

At the pedestrian level a new urban space is formed; conceived of as the extension of Woodward Avenue, providing a space for transition as well as an active urban core. Both above and below, an elevated platform for public events such as fairs, outdoor markets, music concerts and festivals is introduced to the proposal.

The high-rise extrudes from this framework in an industrial red brick-style, inserted as a new architectural addition to the Detroit skyline.

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FOSSA OLFACTORIA_


 

 

 

 

FOSSA OLFACTORIA

 

 

 

 

FOSSA OLFACTORIA_


 

 

 

 

FOSSA OLFACTORIA

 

 

 

 

Fossa Olfactoria manifests smell as both an olfactory and tactile experience. While scent is oft unexplored or completely omitted from serious discussions of architecture, scent and odor shape experience, occupancy, and comfort in powerful ways.

This installation brings the viewer into the epicenter of olfactory experience  -  the spatial cavity where the olfactory bulb is located - playing on notions of scale, phenomena, and bodily experience. An immersive, fleshy fabric membrane obscures an undulating massing of one thousand balloons.

The balloons act as both sculptors of space and vessels of scent. Each balloon contains a drop of lavender oil which is released into the air as the balloons deflate, producing a pulsing wall that diffuses scent gradually.

Collaboration with Katie MacDonald at the Kirkland Gallery, Harvard Graduate School of Design,

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Cranbrook Academy_


 

 

 

CRANBROOK ACADEMY:
CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

 

 

 

 

 

Cranbrook Academy_


 

 

 

CRANBROOK ACADEMY:
CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

 

 

 

 

 

Center for the Performing Arts at the Cranbrook Educational Community
Option Studio 01318 – Tod Williams & Billie Tsien

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The Performing Arts Center will be both an academic building and a public building. While its primary purpose will be to serve the Cranbrook Educational Community, the Center will also be public, directly serving the local and Detroit communities. Events will draw audiences from outside the campus; and other schools and organizations will be encouraged to take advantage of the Center, via productions, rental, and collaboration (directorial, writing, actors, and even stagecraft).

The program includes a mix of adaptable performance spaces, from a more formally defined theater to the more flexible black box theater and dance studio. Serving these are rehearsal spaces, technical support spaces, workshops, and storage. The center will provide space for public performances but will also be a place for teaching. In addition, the program provides facilities for traveling and resident performers.

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Design Miami


Design Miami


Welcoming all to Design Miami, Pitch takes the vinyl tent as a provocation, not to reconsider the canopy as an overhead shelter, but to rethink the ground—to pitch the tent upside-down as a landscape. Visitors enter and exit the fair over, under, and through a geometric landscape that is both familiar and unexpected: structurally and materially similar to the existing tents, yet habitable and spatial in new ways. Sloped surfaces provide shaded seating for events and leisure, framing a courtyard and reorienting the entrance toward the Botanic Garden, Convention Center and the ocean. The interior surfaces of the pavilion are covered in low-resilience polyurethane ‘memory’ foam, which provides a safe and comfortable surface for play and relaxation. During the week of the show, the constant deformation of the foam is gradually imprinted on its surface and becomes a record of the event. In addition to the two existing Design Miami tents, the underside of the large slope is used as a partially enclosed public exhibition space. This ‘third tent’ will feature work from the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and will extend the fair-going experience to all visitors.

Pitch is a play on the materiality and geometry of the tents as its immediate context, but also as widely recognizable features of Design Miami.  At the conclusion of the fair, the pavilion will be recycled; the steel and aluminum will be processed at local facilities and the PVC membrane will be cut and manufactured into Design-Miami branded umbrellas, as a final iteration of the tent particularly well-suited to Miami’s beach culture.

Rather than propose a stand-alone pavilion independent of the larger event space, Pitch is a mediating interface—a vibrant public platform for Design Miami. Like a landscape, Pitch is illusory. From one view, it seems to extend out from the tents. From another, it is an excavation. The Design Miami logo is similarly animated as an anamorphic projection, coming into and out of alignment as visitors approach and enter the pavilion. After circulating through the exhibitions, fair-goers exit the tent into a small oasis and join passersby on the slopes. This new terrain is a destination against the flat ocean horizon so familiar to Miami—a space of gathering and exploration. 

Collaboration with Mikhail Grinwald, Katie MacDonald, & Jake Rudin

Interior Rendering

Night Rendering

Night Rendering

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Schoolhouse South Africa


 

 

 

 

 

 

Schoolhouse South Africa


 

 

 

 

 

 

Johannesburg, South Africa
26°01'35.0"S 27°55'12.5"E
Completed 2012

Size:
6,000 SF / 560 M2

The schoolhouse, now known as 'Thingo Kids Preschool' serves a mixed-income neighborhood in Cosmo City, Johannesburg. It is the first early childhood education center in the community where most children are sent to crèches (daycares) that lack in resources and academic curriculum.

Awards & Press:
- Winner, 2013 Engineering News Record (ENR) Global Best Projects Award
- Finalist / Popular Choice Winner, 2013 Architizer A+ Award
- Winner, 2011 Oikos Sustainable Campus Leader Award
- Winner, 2011 Cornell Leadership in Sustainability Award
- Featured on CNBC Africa: Business Spotlight, ArchDaily, Housing in Southern Africa, Cornell media, and media in South Africa, United States, and Spain.

The school is an early childhood development (ECD) center in Johannesburg, South Africa. It accommodates 80 children and houses a teacher-training center. The school is a product of a two year process orchestrated by Cornell University Sustainable Design, an interdisciplinary student-led organization at Cornell University. Students, with the help of academic advisors and industry professionals, executed the project through a semester of research, a semester of design development integrated into the Bachelor of Architecture comprehensive design studio curriculum, and three months of construction.

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PROFESSORS:
Jeremy Foster, Kifle G Gebremedhin, Werner Goehner, George Hascup, Alex Mergold, Arthur Ovaska, Andrea Simitch

STUDENTS VOLUNTEERS:
Barry Beagen (Project Director), Andrew Fu (Lead Designer), Shuping Liu (Construction Drawing Coordinator), Thomas Shouler (Structural Engineer), Jonathan Leape (Construction Manager), Mikey Jiang (Utilities), Karen Chi-Chi Lin (Marketing and Communications), Carly Dean (Exhibition Director and On-Site Safety Manager), Jesse McElwain (Director of Development)

Sidney Beaty, Joe Beaudette, Yen Chiang, Christine Chung, Alex Cote, Jorge Cuervo Manrique, Mercedes Cuvi, Will Dibernardo, Robert Dicker, Juliette Dubroca, Mary Bray Erickson, Ben Fleury, Jessica Fracassini, Stephanie Glass, Stephanie Gitto, Mikhail Grinwald, Wendy Gu, Peter Gudonis, Laura Hammerer, Donald Hicks, Wei-Yen Hsieh, Siyabonga Jezile, Alexandrea Klimoski, Yoonjee Koh, Joecyln Kuo, Tiffany Kuo, Johnny Lau, Brian Lee, Michael Lee, Jacqueline Liu, Daniel Lu, Erin Pellegrino, Lexi Quint, Jake Rudin, Eric Rutgers, Lillian Simon, Alex Simpson, Tito Soto, Elliot Sperling, Carina Steinhoff, Jose Tijerina,Daniel Torres, Maria Villarraga, Shu Wang

Photo credits: Andrew Fu and the CUSD team.